tyciol (tyciol) wrote in mattfurey,
tyciol
tyciol
mattfurey

Your Age Doesn't Matter

This article (unquoted) is an interesting analysis of what people of different ages do in China. While China may not be the perfect society (and I have a feeling that not everyone follows the habits he's talking about), it does have a rich cultural history of martial arts and religion which we could learn interesting concepts from.

The mention of internal organs is great, and I fully agree that they should be heeded more carefully. They are never brought to light in the age of modern medicine unless they're malfunctioning to an extreme degree. The problem is that you can't really train them... but definately, moving the torso and contorting it does help to put varying pressures (or lack thereof) on them, which can only help adapt their resiliance to varying situations. I actually attended a cancer lecture two nights ago discussing biological medicine and it mentioned how having an effective working internal system can help prevent an assorted variety of diseases.

So, squeezing the organs with certain movements can help flush out toxins, or whatever. That's not really enough alone, you still need lots of water to keep them going and a strong immune system, along with anti-oxidants and the whole nut to keep them working. I'm honestly not sure how effective stuff like the Tai Chi waist turner (which I've done in yoga classes... so it obviously gets around) is on the organs. Apparently it 'massages' them, which is great, but I think walking would probably do just as much.

This new 'Chinese Long-Life System' is Matt's new baby and like in the past, he never misses a beat in hyping the product. I guess that's to be expected though, it is a free newsletter after all and you need to get some rewards in return for offering it. Still, I can't help but wonder if it's a tad biased, and why it's necessarily so much better than all the other various chinese forms of study into the body's energy systems affected by touch which I have seen, such as massage, acupressure, acupuncture, shiatsu and tai chi, all available free at public libraries.
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic
  • 3 comments